Research interests

Our PhD award scheme supports high quality scholarship on Froebelian education. This page provides detail about the research of our current bursary holders. Their research topics are:

  • Reconceptualising professional development in early childhood education and care

  • Mapping emerging musicality: a longitudinal study of musical development in the early years using the Sound of Intent Framework

  • The effect of war and displacement on the play of young Iraqi and Syrian child refugees living in Lebanon. 

Reconceptualising professional development in early childhood education

 Valeria Scacchi

This PhD study is a critical investigation and reconceptualisation of in-service professional learning and development strategies and practices for early childhood educators in England, aiming at developing and promoting an approach to professional development and learning that is firmly grounded in Froebelian philosophy, values and practices. 

Mapping emerging musicality: a longitudinal study of musical development in the early years using the sound of intent framework. 

Angela Voyajolu

This doctoral project concerning music in the early years is situated in the context of Froebelian principles that stress the importance of early learning, singing, movement and rhyme for the education and care of young children (Tovey, 2012), and primary importance of play to children’s wellbeing and development (Weston, 2002). Central too is Froebel’s recognition of the importance of interaction through sound and music between caregiver and child. 

The effect of war and displacement on the play of young Iraqi and Syrian refugees. 

Sandra El Gemayel

Research shows that conflict and displacement constrain children’s opportunities to play, to learn through play, and for their unique potential to flourish. Yet, there are no in-depth studies of the effects of war and displacement on young child refugees in Lebanon. My research aims to investigate what play opportunities are available to these children, how their experiences of war and displacement affect the ways they play, and what measures could be taken to improve their play opportunities. Froebelian principles lie at the core of this study which promotes the integrity of childhood in its own right, the indispensable benefits of play, and the role of the environment in a child’s development. 

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